Te Pou o te Whakaaro Nui and Le Va have published a new report that shares information on aspects of New Zealand’s adult mental health and addiction workforce relevant to workforce development strategies aimed at increasing cultural responsiveness to Pasifika peoples.

The report is part of the 2014 More than numbers project, which has gathered and shared data on the sector’s workforce to help inform workforce planning. 

Report on Pasifika workforce

Current government policy includes a number of workforce development strategies that aim to improve Pasifika participation in service delivery and health outcomes for Pasifika peoples. Some of the strategies include increasing Pasifika participation in the health workforce, introducing new models of care that meet the health needs of Pasifika peoples, and improving the overall competence of the health workforce to better work with Pasifika peoples. 

This report describes the results of the 2014 Te Pou and Matua Raki More than numbers organisation workforce survey of Vote Health funded adult mental health and addiction services pertaining to workforce development strategies for Pasifika.

Some findings from the report include the following.

  • Half of all respondents thought there might be future shortages of Pasifika staff for clinical roles and one-third thought the same for Pasifika staff to fill non-clinical roles.
  • Pasifika representation in the workforce was 5 per cent, lower than the adult population and as consumers of services (6 per cent each).
  • Pasifika representation in the clinical workforce and in the DHB workforce was very low at 3 per cent each. 
  • Two per cent of the total workforce reported to the survey were employed in dedicated Pasifika services (142 FTEs).
  • Most survey respondents thought their workforce needed some or a large increase in skills for working with Pasifika peoples.

The report contains a range of additional information and can be used to inform regional and national workforce development strategies that aim to improve the responsiveness of service delivery and health outcomes for Pasifika peoples.

Read the full report: Pasifika adult mental health and addiction workforce: 2014 survey of Vote Health funded services.