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About 2022 NGO workforce survey

In June/July 2022, Te Pou is conducting a third NGO survey to collect information about the workforce in alcohol and drug and mental health (including forensic mental health) services for adults.

The survey describes the uniqueness of the NGO sector workforce. It will provide useful information to support ongoing NGO sector advocacy for contract equity, workforce planning and development, and demonstrate NGOs’ substantial contribution to the overall mental health and addiction sector workforce.

Participants will receive the survey link by email in late June. The survey is voluntary, and organisations can withdraw at any time up to publication of results. Completed surveys will be confidential and anonymised before being stored securely. Only summarised information will be reported so the workforce of individual organisations will not be identifiable in any publications or datasets.

Te Pou will use survey results to estimate the regional and national workforce size, composition, turnover, and NGO workforce development challenges. Regional and national estimates will be published on our website. These estimates will be available to inform:

  • workforce planning and development to further health sector workforce goals described in Kia Manawanui Aotearoa: Long-term Pathway to Mental Wellbeing; Whakamaua: Māori Health Action Plan 2020 to 2025; and Ola Manuia: Pacific Health and Wellbeing Action Plan 2020 to 2025
  • understanding how the NGO sector has changed since the 2018 He Ara Oranga: Report of the Government Inquiry into Mental Health and Addiction and determining what more needs to happen
  • future evaluations of reformed health sector workforce activities.

An MS Word copy of the survey is available here.

Survey categories

The survey asks participants to summarise their full-time equivalent (FTE) employed and vacant workforce for each region, into specific role groups. More information about these categories is provided below.

Full time equivalent (FTE) workforce

FTEs positions are calculated as the total number of hours per week worked by employees in the role group, divided by 40 hours. For example, if the total hours per week worked by 11 peer support workers is 320, then the FTE positions employed would be 320/40=8 FTEs.

Regions

The survey asks for summary FTE information for each of the following regions.

  • Northern (including former Northland, Waitematā, Auckland, Counties Manukau DHBs).
  • Te Manawa Taki (previously Midland region, including former Waikato, Lakes, Bay of Plenty, Tairāwhiti, Taranaki DHBs).
  • Central (including former MidCentral, Hawke’s Bay, Whanganui, Wairarapa, Capital & Coast, Hutt DHBs).
  • Te Wai Pounamu (previously South Island region, including former Nelson-Marlborough, Canterbury/West Coast, South Canterbury, Southern DHBs).

A spreadsheet is available to help providers summarise their workforce across multiple former DHBs into relevant regions if required, click here.

Role groups

The survey asks for information summarised into in the following role groups.

Lived experience roles
Consumer advisors People with lived experience of problematic substance use or mental health challenges and recovery, employed to provide operational and strategic advice and leadership to ensure the voices and experiences of people who access services influence organisation development and direction.
Peer support workers People with lived experience of problematic substance use or mental health challenges and recovery, employed to use their lived experience to work alongside individuals or groups to nurture hope, personal power, and wellbeing.
Whānau support workers People with lived experience of supporting a whānau member experiencing problematic substance use or mental health challenges, employed to use their lived experience to support other whānau experiencing similar issues.
Other lived experience workers People with lived experience of problematic substance use or mental health challenges and recovery, employed to use their lived experience to support either people accessing services or people in other workforce roles. Role titles may include peer or consumer advocate, peer supervisor, peer trainer or educator.
Māori and Pasifika roles
Kaumātua (male and female) Māori elders who hold the status, tradition, and integrity of their iwi and hapū, provide advice and guidance on tikanga and kawa, and facilitate the cultural development of younger generations.
Māori cultural advisors People employed to use their knowledge of te reo Māori me ōna tikanga to provide operational and strategic advice and leadership to ensure Māori people’s perspectives, expectations, and requirements are upheld in organisation development and direction.
Māori cultural workers People employed to use their knowledge of te reo Māori me ōna tikanga and Māori health models and practices to support people and whānau on their tino rangatiratanga journey to health and wellbeing. They may hold a professional registration, but this is not required for the role. Role titles might include iwi support worker, pukenga atawhai, kaimahi tautoko, kaiāwhina, whānau ora kaimahi, mataora.
Rongoā Māori practitioners People trained in rongoā Māori practices, who are employed to deliver a holistic system of healing derived from Māori philosophy and customs. Role titles may include tohunga, kaimahi, kaiāwhina.
Māori cultural and health professionals People who are dually competent as registered health professionals and in te reo Māori me ōna tikanga and Māori health models and practices, employed to provide cultural and clinical services to people and whānau.
Matua Pasifika elders or traditional leaders (male or female) e.g. matai or matāpule, who hold traditional leadership roles in their communities and are custodians and recognised authorities on cultural protocols, language, knowledge and customs.
Pasifika cultural advisors People employed to use their knowledge of Pasifika protocols, language(s), and customs to provide operational and strategic advice and leadership so that Pasifika peoples’ perspectives, expectations, and requirements are upheld in organisation development and direction.
Pasifika cultural workers Pasifika people who can either access others or use their own knowledge of Pasifika protocols, language(s), knowledge, and customs and are employed to support people and whānau on their journey towards achieving mo’ui lelei/ora/ola, that is good health and wellbeing. They may hold a professional registration, but this is not required for the role.
Other roles
Support workers People employed to support people experiencing problematic substance use or mental health challenges and their whānau to achieve their recovery goals. Support workers may work independently or as part of a team. They are generally expected to have or be working towards a Level 4 Certificate in Health and Wellbeing. They may hold higher qualifications and professional registration, but this is not required for the role. Role titles might include community support worker, residential support worker, kaiāwhina, mataora, kaiwhakapuaki waiora, employment worker, family support worker.
Addiction practitioners Registered social and health professionals providing addiction treatment. They may be registered or endorsed with dapaanz but this is not required for the role.
Nurses Nurses registered with the Nursing Council of New Zealand including registered nurses, nurse practitioners, nurse specialists, nurse educators, and enrolled nurses.
Other registered health professions Registered health professionals who provide clinical mental health and addiction treatment and support to people and whānau eg social workers, occupational therapists, psychologists, psychiatrists, medical practitioners, counsellors, psychotherapists, and clinicians in assessment, coordination, and liaison roles.
Service managers and team leaders Dedicated team leaders and service managers who provide direct line management to the mental health and addiction service delivery workers. This group may include people with lived experience leading lived experience teams.
Administration, business, and technical support roles Dedicated administration, business and technical roles that support the workforce delivering mental health and addiction treatment and support. Role titles might include administrator, receptionist, IT specialist, cook, cleaner, housekeeper, driver, security guard.

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